Fire safety



Testfires with DNV-GL


We did Capacity Assessments with DNV and below are a couple of films from these tests.

Testfire with gasoline


A barrel of gasoline is pre-burned in order to get hot and then it is extinguished.

Testfire with kitchen oil


A classic situation that one can encounter in the home. Kitchen oil that begins to burn on the stove in the pan.

Testfire with kitchen oil


Another test with kitchen oil. The type of extinguishing is different here to see how the oil reacts.

Maximum reach


Here we test the effective range of the Firemill.


The best fire is the one that never starts


Three tips for a fire-free kitchen:
1. Never walk away from the stove when it is on and cooking is in progress.
2. Never have items on or near the stove that that can easily catch fire.
3. Clean the cooker hood frequently; grease in the filter can start to burn.


How to survive a fire


Smoke detectors are great tools in the fight against catastrophe. There are a few things to think about to make them as effective as possible:
1. Do you have different ceiling heights at home, far between the rooms or something that delays the smoke, such as doors? If so, get several smoke detectors.
2. Install a smoke detector in the room closest to the kitchen to get an early warning if a fire starts there.
3. Are you going on a vacation? Bring a travel smoke detector.
4. Test your smoke detectors frequently, especially after returning home from a vacation.
5. Do you have a vacation home, boat or country house? Install smoke detectors there.



Testfire in Kitchen


Testfire in real kitchen setting. (This should not be done at home, we performed these tests in a controlled environment). It is important to practice at home but you should always be very careful with the fan.


Information


We took the opportunity to make an improv infovideo while we were at it - nevertheless very important.

The best fire is the one that never starts


Three tips for a fire-free kitchen:
1. Never walk away from the stove when it is on and cooking is in progress.
2. Never have items on or near the stove that that can easily catch fire.
3. Clean the cooker hood frequently; grease in the filter can start to burn.

How to survive a fire


Smoke detectors are great tools in the fight against catastrophe. There are a few things to think about to make them as effective as possible:
1. Do you have different ceiling heights at home, far between the rooms or something that delays the smoke, such as doors? If so, get several smoke detectors.
2. Install a smoke detector in the room closest to the kitchen to get an early warning if a fire starts there.
3. Are you going on a vacation? Bring a travel smoke detector.
4. Test your smoke detectors frequently, especially after returning home from a vacation.
5. Do you have a vacation home, boat or country house? Install smoke detectors there.

Testfire in real kitchen setting. (This should not be done at home, we performed these tests in a controlled environment). It is important to practice at home but you should always be very careful with the fan.
We took the opportunity to make an improv infovideo while we were at it - nevertheless very important.

Testfires with DNV-GL


We did Capacity Assessments with DNV and below are a couple of films from these tests.

Testfire with gasoline


A barrel of gasoline is pre-burned in order to get hot and then it is extinguished.

Testfire with kitchen oil


A classic situation that one can encounter in the home. Kitchen oil that begins to burn on the stove in the pan.

Testfire with kitchen oil


Another test with kitchen oil. The type of extinguishing is different here to see how the oil reacts.

Maximum reach


Here we test the effective range of the Firemill.